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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
was elected in june, coming out of the muslim brotherhood party, there were a lot of concerns in the u.s. about the direction of egypt as an ally, whether they would be a reliable partner in the kinds of negotiations that we just saw this past week. morsi seems to have walked a very fine line, but so far succeeded. on the one hand he acted as a proxy for hamas in the peace talks with the united states, and on the other hand. he -- egypt and morsi stood by their 30-year peace agreement with israel, and it's a balancing account for president morsi. and president obama praised him for being pragmatic and helping to get this deal done. >> actually, i have to go real quick. but jonathan, you said you were a bit pessimistic about israel and gaza, figuring it out. do you think this is a good start? >> this is actually like a really surprisingly good sign that he would be the -- play this role. just to underscore this, he hasn't named israel -- he hasn't referred to it by name since he took office. >> andy kroll, jonathan strong, thanks for coming in. appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> the timing
are watching some major developments at the u.s. supreme court where the nine justices are behind closed doors considering whether to take up cases that will impact same-sex marriage in america. ten marriage equality cases are on the high court's menu. eight of them deal with the federal defense of marriage act, or doma. joining me now is chris geidner. the man who knows the supreme court inside and out, pete williams. pete, good to have you with us. break it down. which cases are we talking about, and how quickly might we find out whether they will move forward? >> reporter: well, if they're going to take any of these cases, thomas, it's very likely we'll find out this afternoon. and i think the most likely event here is that they will grant one of the cases that challenges the federal defense of marriage act. passed in 1966 by congress signed by president clinton, it defines marriage as for federal law purposes as only the legal union of one man and one woman. now, the practical effect of that is that in the nine states that now grant or soon will grant same-sex couples the legal right to ge
and spending cuts that if unaddressed could send the u.s. back into a recession. now, if we do dive over this cliff, here's what could happen. first it could cost the average household about $3500 in taxes. second the economy, it could lose 800,000 jobs. and, third, for those already out of work, 2.1 million americans would lose unemployment benefits and right now we're 47 days away from the deadline to prevent all of that. joining me from columbia, south carolina, msnbc contributor jimmy williams with more on why it matters. so, jimmy, "usa today" did this great chart that breaks it all down, the spending or these tax and spending changes go into effect, because americans across the board are going to be affected on this from the top 1% to the nation's poorest so how likely is it that this will happen? >> well, i don't think it's likely that it happens because i think both sides have a hell of a lot to lose. the president having just come off a re-election and gaining seats in the house and the senate, i think that he has political capital. he would lose a lot of that capital if, in fac
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)